Category Archives: IRS Audit

Charging for Additional Services for Tax Resolution

Hey, it’s Michael Rozbruch here, founder of Roz Strategies, and what do you do after you’ve been retained and you discover there’s additional work to be performed that you never included in your engagement letter?

We call this additional services or an additional service request.  You’re going to get clients, Tax Resolution clients who come to you who you’re gonna be able to sell the entire case at one meeting or in phone call.  In other words, you’re gonna sell all these phases at the same time, which is investigation, compliance work and the permanent resolution.  But let’s say you get a client who comes in.  They say that have two years of unfiled returns.  You’ve taken them through a mini 433-A, and you’ve determined they’re great Offer and Compromise candidates.  So, you get retained.  You do your Engagement Letter.  You’re retained for two years.  You’re retained for the Investigation, two years of tax prep and an Offer and Compromise.  And you’re working the case.  You’re getting the transcripts, and after you analyze the transcripts, you determine, hey wait and second here, there’s five years of unfiled returns.  There’s an extra three years of unfiled returns that you haven’t been contracted for, that you haven’t been paid for.  Well that’s an additional service that needs to be paid.  You need to go back to the taxpayer and let them know that these three years need to be filed.

Now, the way to do this correctly is to include in your Engagement Letters a paragraph that says your flat fee, your fixed fee is predicated upon the representations that the taxpayer told you at the time.  And if additional services are required to permanently resolve your taxpayer’s problem, that additional fees will be requested at that time.  And I did this for 16 years and that additional service piece represented millions of dollars in extra income.  So, don’t be bashful.  Don’t be shy to go back to your client to request payment for additional services you haven’t been contracted for.  If you don’t know how to approach the client when it comes to requesting additional services, all you need to do is say, hey, let’s say the client’s name is Joe.  “Joe, we were contracted to do two years of tax prep for 2014 and 2015 and do your Offer and Compromise.  After we got your tax transcripts and records of account from the IRS, it’s apparent that there are another three years that haven’t been filed, so we need to get those returns filed because we can’t do the Offer and Compromise until you’re in full legal filing compliance, and those three years are gonna be X-amount of money.  And what we’ll do is we’ll include that in the future recurring payments.”  So, we’ll spread that over the six payments that they’re paying you or the four payments or the eight payments. So, it’s not a big deal for your taxpayer, and you’ve just gotten additional services and you’ve gotten paid for the extra work you’re going to do.  So, that’s how you request additional services.  Again, don’t be bashful.  Don’t be shy.  Make sure your retainer agreement has a paragraph permitting you to go back for additional services if it’s required.  You don’t wanna be caught with scope creep because you’ve boxed yourself in on a flat fee.  Flat fees are great.  That’s what you need to do, but you need to cover yourself with a paragraph in your retainer agreement that lets you go back and get additional, to get paid for additional services.

Every IRS Collection Case Has 3 Work Phases

Every IRS Collection Case Has 3 Work Phases:

First Phase: Transcript Investigation & Analysis
Second Phase: Compliance
Third Phase: Resolution Phase

I teach that you charge separately for each phase based on the complexity of the case, the amount of tax debt involved and the value you bring to the table.

In today’s video I want to share a call I had with one of my coaching members on our monthly group Q&A call. This person is brand new to tax resolution and happened to have a client walk into her office who owes 3 million dollars to the IRS. She was asking me for help because she’s trying to interpret the transcripts; plus, she’s talking to the revenue officer; and she’s trying to get all these levies released. I started asking questions about the case, but my first question to her was,

“Well, what have you been retained to do, and how much have you gotten paid to date and what are the total fees for this case?”

Watch today’s video where I share what I told my member what she should charge for each phase of this three-million-dollar case and why she should charge those fees.

It doesn’t matter whether your client owes $25,000 or $3,000,000, the same applies and this is great information to know.

So, that’s the tip of the day, and we’ll see you in the next video!

Do You Cheat On Your Taxes? | Venice Beach, Tax Man on the Street

This is Michael Rozbruch, the Roz Man, and I wanted to release a Tax Season Laugh Video – make sure to check it out:

This is Tax Man on the Street and I went to Venice Beach, California to find out who’s filing and not filing their returns, who’s cheating on their returns, and what they think! Enjoy! 

Wesley Snipes’ Lowball Offer in Compromise Rejected in Tax Court

Wesley Snipes was once best known for his work as an actor, particularly for his role as the vampire-hunting Marvel superhero, Blade. Unfortunately, when Snipes makes headlines these days, it’s usually due to his ongoing tax battle with the IRS. Continue reading

Paul Manafort and Tax Resolution

What does Paul Manafort and tax resolution have in common?
A lot actually…

As we all know, if you’ve been reading the news stories online or watching the evening news, Paul Manafort, Donald Trump’s former campaign manager, was found guilty on five counts of tax fraud, one count of failing to report his foreign bank accounts (FBAR) and two counts of bank fraud.  Robert Mueller’s Special Counsel went after him over the alleged Russia collusion with Donald Trump.  But that’s not what he was found guilty on; he was found guilty of tax fraud.

Your tax resolution clients need to know that when they come to you, and they’ve filed fraudulent tax returns, or haven’t filed legally required income tax returns which they will more than likely disclose to you, there can be major consequences they face for these actions.

You know what I used to tell clients that would ask, “Mike, it’s not that bad is it?” What this week’s video to get a great strategy of how to answer that question if your client asks you the same thing.

michael rozbruch tax and business solutions academy

IRS Marketing

How do you take something that the IRS has said and turn that into a marketing opportunity?

Well, last week Nina Olson, who’s the National Taxpayer Advocate at IRS, came out and stated that the real audit rate in the United States is 6.2%, not 7/10 of 1%. Just to put that in perspective, 7/10 of 1% equates to just over a million audits, and 6.2% equates to nearly 7 million audits. So who’s right? Who’s wrong?

How do you turn that into a marketing opportunity? Here is what the IRS is doing. Their headcount has been decimated over the last 3 or 4 years. It’s down by 23%. So more and more, the IRS is relying on technology, and their computers are generating automatic notices. 70% of the time they’re incorrect. But here’s what the deal is, the IRS knows that there are much less protection rights for taxpayers when they send out these under reporting notices or these math error notices. There are no appeal rights with those. Not like in a real audit where you can appeal it. So your clients are getting all these notices to the tune of 7 or 8 million notices a year that the IRS doesn’t consider an audit. But to you and to your client, if they’re questioning an item on their return, that’s an audit.

So when you’re talking to your client about your Audit Protection Plan, it’s important to let them know that you’re handling all of these notices, not just audits. It’s very, very important. And the IRS is going to be sending more and more and more of these out as years go by, especially with the new Tax Reform Bill that was just signed and that’s effective in 2018. So take that information. Use it in handling objections. Use it as a marketing strategy that the IRS is sending out all these notices, which in fact is very, very true. You have to defend and resolve them. Your time is valuable. You’re either going to charge the client on an hourly basis or with one low annual fee in your Audit Protection Plan, which takes care of responding to all of these notices.

Until next time,

michael rozbruch tax and business solutions academy