Tax Resolution Marketing Tip: How To Close The Deal

I have seen a lot of up-and-coming salespeople (even some seasoned veterans in the tax resolution business) believe that hard selling is the only way to close the deal. They’ve existed in a world where manipulative selling tactics are not only encouraged, but taught. They rely on urgency and aggression to force the recipient into the sale—usually unwillingly. And they wonder why clients want “out” of the engagement and their money back. This is why salespeople, or as we used to call them, tax consultants (or shall I say INSULTants), have such a bad reputation in our industry.

Today’s Tax Resolution Marketing Tip: How To Close The Deal

I have developed what I call my “high ticket sales strategy” (which is in the Tax Resolution Success Resource System, Module 2). It’s more of a “take away” and assumptive selling approach that has earned me a lot of money over the years, because it lends itself to a non-pressured, high close rate among prospects. The truth is, hard selling is a surefire way to dissuade prospects from buying. No matter how genuine you seem, or how legitimate your argument may be, a hard sell almost always comes off sounding like a scam—making you look like some kind of con artist. When your prospect feels pressured, they’re more likely to shut you out entirely—successfully abolishing any consideration of doing business with you in the future.

Fortunately, closing the sale doesn’t have to be “hard,” in fact, it should be the easiest part of the process.

In his book, “Salesmanship For the New Era” (which was written in 1929, by the way), Charles A. Mears encourages salespeople to think of the sales process as a flight of stairs—you can’t possibly leap from the bottom to the top without touching any of the stairs in-between, just like you can’t possibly jump from your opening line to closing the deal without hitting some steps in the middle. Skipping steps will get you there faster, but the bigger the step, the harder it is to take, and the more likely you’ll find the door slammed in your face at the top.

A truly good salesperson builds momentum one step at a time.

They escort the prospect to the top of the stairs and ask them to take just one more step—rather than one giant leap. With each step, and each resounding “Yes!”, the prospect inches closer and closer to the sale. By the time they reach the top, taking that one final step, with one final “Yes!”, feels natural. In this case, both the salesperson and prospect walk away from the sale feeling successful.

And what could have been a hard sell, suddenly seems easy.

For more tax resolution marketing tips – learn more about my products and services http://bit.ly/182Hyi4

Here’s to smart sales!
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